December 2010

December 8 – Happy Birthday Alfredo Aceves

The Yankees found Alfredo Aceves pitching in the Mexican League in 2007. At the time, the right-hander, who was born in Mexico on this date in 1982, had been pitching in the professional league of his native country for the previous five seasons. The scouts loved the fact that he threw four quality pitches with good enough command to call upon any of them in a full-count situation. The Yankees signed him and first called him up to pitch in the Bronx during the 2008 season. His breakout season came in 2009 when he went 10-1 pitching out of the bullpen and became one of the most valuable members of Joe Girardi’s pitching staff. The only time he’s been noticeably ineffective in a Yankee uniform was during the 2009 ALCS against the Angels. Unfortunately, the injury bug hit Alfredo in 2010. He had a herniated disc that kept him off the mound most of the year and he then underwent surgery to repair a broken clavicle he suffered in a postseason bicycle accident back home in Mexico. This explains why the Yankees permitted a pitcher who has accumulated a record of 14-1 with two saves and a 3.21 ERA during his 59 appearances for the team, to become a free agent. If Alfredo’s bad back has healed and he experiences no complications from the recent surgery, I expect him to once again use those four good pitches he can throw on any count and have a real good year pitching for some team in the Majors in 2011. I’m hoping that team will be the Yankees.

Today is also the birthday of a Yankee pitcher who called it quits after a season during which he won twenty games for the first time in his career. This one-time Yankee shortstop and this Yankee outfielder were also born on December 8th.

Year Age Tm Lg W L W-L% ERA G GS GF CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR BB SO WHIP
2008 25 NYY AL 1 0 1.000 2.40 6 4 1 0 0 0 30.0 25 8 8 4 10 16 1.167
2009 26 NYY AL 10 1 .909 3.54 43 1 10 0 0 1 84.0 69 36 33 10 16 69 1.012
2010 27 NYY AL 3 0 1.000 3.00 10 0 2 0 0 1 12.0 10 5 4 1 4 2 1.167
6 Yrs 30 14 .682 3.69 194 15 86 0 0 29 361.0 310 158 148 42 125 266 1.205
NYY (3 yrs) 14 1 .933 3.21 59 5 13 0 0 2 126.0 104 49 45 15 30 87 1.063
BOS (3 yrs) 16 13 .552 3.94 135 10 73 0 0 27 235.0 206 109 103 27 95 179 1.281
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 12/8/2013.

December 7 – Happy Birthday Coggins & Johnson

No, I am not wishing a Happy Birthday to a law firm that represents the Yankees. Before New York made it back to the World Series in 1976, George Steinbrenner was constantly prodding the Yankee front office to acquire and experiment with players that might help the Yankees get there. Usually, these were veterans who at one time or another had done something noteworthy in their careers. Two such players, both outfielders and both born on the anniversary of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, were Rich Coggins and Alex Johnson. Just two years before New York purchased him from the Expos, Coggins had batted .319 during his rookie season in Baltimore. Although that average plunged by close to seventy points the following year, the speedy Indianapolis native stole 26 bases for the Birds in 1974. He got into 51 games for New York in 1975 but batted just .224. It was evident he had lost the stroke and confidence he exhibited during his rookie season.

A bad stroke or lack of confidence were never problems for Alex Johnson. Born in Helena, Arkansas in 1930 and raised in Detroit, Johnson had been a .300-hitting outfielder on the early version of Cincinnati’s Big Red Machine teams of 1968 and ’69. He had also won the AL batting title when he hit .329 for the 1970 Angels. Alex’s problems were his unfriendly personality and horrible defensive skills. The Yankees purchased his contract from the Rangers in August of 1974. He hit just .214 for New York the rest of that season and then just .261 as a part time DH in 1975. The Yankees let him go after that season.

The most famous Yankee to be born on this infamous date is this first baseman who won four rings during his stay in the Bronx and this six-time Gold Glove winner.

Yankee regular season stats for Alex Johnson:

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1974 NYY 10 28 28 3 6 1 0 1 2 0 0 3 .214 .214 .357 .571
1975 NYY 52 128 119 15 31 5 1 1 15 2 7 21 .261 .297 .345 .641
13 Yrs 1322 4948 4623 550 1331 180 33 78 525 113 244 626 .288 .326 .392 .718
PHI (2 yrs) 140 396 371 45 110 16 4 12 46 5 21 86 .296 .339 .458 .797
STL (2 yrs) 106 280 261 27 55 9 3 3 18 7 14 44 .211 .258 .303 .561
TEX (2 yrs) 272 1149 1077 119 311 40 6 12 109 30 60 141 .289 .329 .370 .699
CAL (2 yrs) 221 920 856 104 265 34 6 16 107 22 50 102 .310 .353 .419 .772
CIN (2 yrs) 288 1206 1126 165 353 50 10 19 146 27 51 140 .313 .346 .426 .772
NYY (2 yrs) 62 156 147 18 37 6 1 2 17 2 7 24 .252 .282 .347 .629
CLE (1 yr) 108 384 356 31 85 10 1 8 37 6 22 40 .239 .283 .340 .623
DET (1 yr) 125 457 429 41 115 15 2 6 45 14 19 49 .268 .298 .354 .653
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 12/7/2013.
Yankee regular season stats for Alex Johnson:
Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1975 NYY 51 119 107 7 24 1 0 1 6 3 7 16 .224 .272 .262 .534
1976 NYY 7 4 4 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 .250 .250 .250 .500
5 Yrs 342 1191 1083 125 287 42 13 12 90 50 72 100 .265 .312 .361 .673
BAL (3 yrs) 239 924 839 112 237 36 12 11 74 43 58 61 .282 .331 .393 .724
NYY (2 yrs) 58 123 111 8 25 1 0 1 7 4 7 17 .225 .271 .261 .532
MON (1 yr) 13 40 37 1 10 3 1 0 4 0 1 7 .270 .289 .405 .695
CHW (1 yr) 32 104 96 4 15 2 0 0 5 3 6 15 .156 .206 .177 .383
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 12/7/2013.

December 6 – Happy Birthday Jose Contreras

The real problem the Yankees had with pitcher Jose Contreras was that they had to pay him $32 million to convince him not to sign with the Red Sox, after the big right-hander defected from Castro’s Cuba in October of 2002. New York’s generosity in pursuit of Contreras evoked the famous statement from Red Sox owner, Larry Lucchino in which he labeled his AL Eastern Division arch rivals, the “Evil Empire.” So the expectations for this guy were huge within the Yankee front office and their enthusiastic and self congratulatory gushing over his signing caused Yankee fans like me to believe Contreras would pitch even better in pinstripes than his fellow Cuban defector, Orlando Hernandez had done a few years earlier. So when Contreras did not pitch as well as El Duque did, especially during his second (2004) season with New York, the fans would boo and the Yankee front office would sweat nervously. Joe Torre shuffled him between the starting rotation and the bullpen in an effort to find his comfort zone but that never really happened.

Having written all that, it is important to note that Contreras was not exactly a bust in pinstripes. During his season and a half in New York he compiled a 15-7 record, which included a 6-1 record as a starter in his rookie season when he also posted an ERA of 3.30. That was not enough return for Steinbrenner et al on their $32 million investment. The front office became intent on dumping Contreras and as much of his remaining contract as possible and ended up sending him and a bundle of cash to the White Sox for starter Esteban Loaiza at the 2004 All Star break. The deal looked good on paper for New York because Loaiza had won 21 games for Chicago the season before and was 9-5 thus far in 2004 at the time of the trade. But he failed miserably as a Yankee while Contreras finally got his big league bearings in the Windy City and became a key starter in the rotation that led the White Sox to the 2005 World Championship. Contreras was born on December 6, 1971 in La Martinas, Cuba. He pitched in the Phillie bullpen last season.

Today is also the birthday of the Yankee nicknamed “Poosh em Up,” this former Yankee coach and this former Yankee outfielder.

December 4 – Happy Birthday Bob Shawkey

It was a huge honor for CC Sabathia to be given the first ever start in the new Yankee Stadium in 2009. Although the Yankees and CC ended up losing the game to Cleveland, New York did go on to win their 27th World Series title during the new ballpark’s inaugural season. Eighty seven years ago, Bob Shawkey was given the honor of starting the first game ever in the old Yankee Stadium. Shawkey did better than Sabathia. He beat the Red Sox, 4-1 and the Yankees went on to win their very first World Series during their first year in their new stadium. New York had purchased Shawkey from the Philadelphia Athletics midway through the 1915 season. The following year, the fast-balling right-hander broke out with a 24-14 record, the first of what would be four 20-victory seasons in pinstripes. His career was interrupted when he served in the Navy during WWI but when he returned from active duty in 1919, he started a streak of six consecutive seasons during which he won at least 16 games. He also pitched in four World Series for New York (and one with the A’s) but fared poorly, winning just one of three postseason decisions. After three consecutive losing seasons, Shawkey hung up his glove for good following the 1927 season. When Miller Huggins died suddenly during the 1929 season, the Yankees gave his managerial position to Shawkey. The 1930 Yankees went 86-68 in Shawkey’s first season at the helm but with five future Hall of Famers in the lineup and three more on the pitching staff, their third place finish wasn’t good enough for the team’s brass. Shawkey’s first year as Manager turned out to be his only year and he was replaced by the legendary Joe McCarthy. Shawkey was born December 4, 1890 in Sigel, PA. He died in 1980.

Shawkey shares his December 4th birthday with the tallest of the three “Killer B” pitching prospects, this former Yankee catcherand this former closer who was once MLB’s all-time saves leader.

Here’s Shawkey’s regular season Yankee and career stats:

Year Tm W L W-L% ERA G GS GF CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR BB SO WHIP
1915 NYY 4 7 .364 3.26 16 9 6 5 1 0 85.2 78 38 31 2 35 31 1.319
1916 NYY 24 14 .632 2.21 53 27 24 21 4 8 276.2 204 78 68 4 81 122 1.030
1917 NYY 13 15 .464 2.44 32 26 5 16 2 0 236.1 207 81 64 2 72 97 1.181
1918 NYY 1 1 .500 1.13 3 2 1 1 1 0 16.0 7 2 2 0 10 3 1.063
1919 NYY 20 11 .645 2.72 41 27 11 22 3 5 261.1 218 94 79 7 92 122 1.186
1920 NYY 20 13 .606 2.45 38 31 6 20 5 2 267.2 246 88 73 10 85 126 1.237
1921 NYY 18 12 .600 4.08 38 31 6 18 3 2 245.0 245 131 111 15 86 126 1.351
1922 NYY 20 12 .625 2.91 39 34 4 22 3 1 299.2 286 112 97 16 98 130 1.281
1923 NYY 16 11 .593 3.51 36 31 3 17 1 1 258.2 232 114 101 17 102 125 1.291
1924 NYY 16 11 .593 4.12 38 25 8 10 1 0 207.2 226 107 95 11 74 114 1.445
1925 NYY 6 14 .300 4.11 33 19 8 9 1 0 186.0 209 101 85 12 67 81 1.484
1926 NYY 8 7 .533 3.62 29 10 14 3 1 3 104.1 102 49 42 5 37 63 1.332
1927 NYY 2 3 .400 2.89 19 2 11 0 0 4 43.2 44 19 14 1 16 23 1.374
15 Yrs 195 150 .565 3.09 488 333 117 197 33 28 2937.0 2722 1200 1008 111 1018 1360 1.273
NYY (13 yrs) 168 131 .562 3.12 415 274 107 164 26 26 2488.2 2304 1014 862 102 855 1163 1.269
PHA (3 yrs) 27 19 .587 2.93 73 59 10 33 7 2 448.1 418 186 146 9 163 197 1.296
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 12/5/2013.

Here’s Shawkey’s record as Yankee manager:

Rk Year Age Tm Lg W L W-L% G Finish
1 1930 39 New York Yankees AL 86 68 .558 154 3
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 12/5/2013.

December 3 – Happy Birthday Harry Simpson

It was a pinstripe birthday celebration that made today’s Pinstripe Birthday Blog posting possible. On May 16, 1957, Yankee second baseman, Billy Martin turned 29-years-old. A bunch of Yankees went out on the town that evening to celebrate with their fiery teammate and they ended up at the late show of Manhattan’s Copacabana Nightclub. That’s where Martin and his pals got into a brawl in the famous nightspot’s men’s room and when it was over, a supposedly belligerent patron was on his way to the hospital and Martin was on his way out of his beloved Yankee uniform. New York’s ultra conservative GM, George Weiss had enough of Martin’s continuous forays into controversial events and in July of that season, he sent the future Yankee manager to Kansas City as part of a seven player transaction that netted New York reliever Ryne Duren and outfielder Harry Simpson. Harry was coming off the best year of his career in 1955, when he hit 21 home runs, drove in 105, led the league in triples and made his one and only AL All Star team. But he was joining a Yankee team that was loaded with good outfielders and the reduced playing time was not helpful to Simpson’s rhythm at the plate. When the Atlanta, Georgia native hit just .083 during New York’s seven-game loss to the Braves in that year’s World Series, Harry’s days in the Bronx were numbered. Exactly one year to the day he was acquired from the A’s, Weiss traded Simpson back to Kansas City. He was then traded three more times in the next year earning him the nickname “Suitcase.” He played his last big league ball game in September of 1959. He passed away in 1979, when he was just 53 years old.

Also born on this date is this Yankee first baseman who started at that position for New York during the first half of the 1950s. This one-time Yankee starting pitcher and this one too also share Simpson’s birthday.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1957 NYY 75 247 224 27 56 7 3 7 39 1 19 36 .250 .307 .402 .709
1958 NYY 24 58 51 1 11 2 1 0 6 0 6 12 .216 .310 .294 .604
8 Yrs 888 3138 2829 343 752 101 41 73 381 17 271 429 .266 .331 .408 .739
KCA (5 yrs) 389 1483 1344 164 391 54 25 40 210 5 121 208 .291 .349 .458 .806
CLE (4 yrs) 353 1256 1120 143 276 31 11 24 111 11 121 157 .246 .323 .358 .681
NYY (2 yrs) 99 305 275 28 67 9 4 7 45 1 25 48 .244 .308 .382 .690
PIT (1 yr) 9 15 15 3 4 2 0 0 2 0 0 2 .267 .267 .400 .667
CHW (1 yr) 38 79 75 5 14 5 1 2 13 0 4 14 .187 .228 .360 .588
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 12/3/2013.