July 2010

July 30 – Happy Birthday Casey Stengel

caseySince Stengel managed the Yankees over a half century ago, it would be helpful to younger fans to compare his achievements as New York’s skipper to the much more recent tenure of Joe Torre. Casey and Torre each managed the Yankees for a dozen seasons. Both men had losing records managing other teams. Stengel’s Yankee teams won 1,149 ball games and Torre’s squads won 1,173. Stengel, managing during the era of 154-game seasons, achieved a winning percentage with New York of .623 compared to Torre’s .605. Stengel’s teams won 10 AL Pennants and 7 World Series titles while Torre’s Yankees won 6 and 4 respectively. Torre’s teams made the postseason in each of his dozen seasons as skipper under baseball’s current divisional structure that didn’t exist in Stengel’s era.

Both Managers left the Yankees reluctantly, with bitter tastes in their mouths. Stengel was let go after the Yankees lost the 1960 World Series to the Pirates during which some of his managerial decisions were questioned. Stengel insisted he was fired for “being too old.” Torre, on the other hand, turned down a one-year incentive laden contract to continue managing New York, after the team again failed to make it to the World Series in 2007. I don’t think Stengel, who was definitely the highest paid manager in the game in his day, probably averaging $75 to $100 thousand in salary per season, would have turned down the $5 million offer Torre refused.

Charles Dillon Stengel  was born in Kansas City, MO on this date in 1890. His nickname is derived from the name of his hometown.

Casey shares his July 30th birthday with this one-time Yankee DH and first baseman, this catcher who briefly played for him and this former Yankee pitcher.

Rk Year Age Tm Lg G W L W-L% Finish
10 1949 58 New York Yankees AL 155 97 57 .630 1 WS Champs
11 1950 59 New York Yankees AL 155 98 56 .636 1 WS Champs
12 1951 60 New York Yankees AL 154 98 56 .636 1 WS Champs
13 1952 61 New York Yankees AL 154 95 59 .617 1 WS Champs
14 1953 62 New York Yankees AL 151 99 52 .656 1 WS Champs
15 1954 63 New York Yankees AL 155 103 51 .669 2
16 1955 64 New York Yankees AL 154 96 58 .623 1 AL Pennant
17 1956 65 New York Yankees AL 154 97 57 .630 1 WS Champs
18 1957 66 New York Yankees AL 154 98 56 .636 1 AL Pennant
19 1958 67 New York Yankees AL 155 92 62 .597 1 WS Champs
20 1959 68 New York Yankees AL 155 79 75 .513 3
21 1960 69 New York Yankees AL 155 97 57 .630 1 AL Pennant
Brooklyn Dodgers 3 years 463 208 251 .453 6.0
Boston Braves 6 years 870 373 491 .432 6.5
New York Yankees 12 years 1851 1149 696 .623 1.3 10 Pennants and 7 World Series Titles
New York Mets 4 years 582 175 404 .302 10.0
25 years 3766 1905 1842 .508 4.5 10 Pennants and 7 World Series Titles
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 7/30/2013.

July 27 – Happy Birthday Alex Rodriguez

Update: This original post was written during the 2010 season. I’ve added the first paragraph in August of 2013.

As a student of Yankee history, I find myself wondering how will Yankee fans fifty years from now look back at the behavior of A-Rod from the 2012 postseason onward.  Ryan Dempster did  something I didn’t think was possible. He made me root for Alex Rodriguez again. Don’t get me wrong, I still wish the greedy and self-absorbed A-Rod had never been a member of my favorite team’s roster but what Dempster did when he threw at Rodriguez was gutless. It was also stupid. In fact, from this point forward, I will be referring to the Boston pitcher as Ryan Dumb-ster.

As A-Rod celebrates his 38th birthday and continues his now-sputtering quest to become Baseball’s all-time home run king, you would think he is a lot more at peace with himself than he was just two years ago at this time. I believe the key is that he has finally stopped trying to portray himself one way to the public while living his private life in a completely different way.

I did not become a true fan of A-Rod the player until 2007, when two things happened simultaneously. First, he had the most incredible year on the field of any Yankee I’ve ever seen play the game. Secondly, he learned how to say “no comment” whenever the New York media asked him questions that were not about his play on the field.

Then, A-Rod and his agent, Scott Boras orchestrated that tasteless and clueless announcement during the 2007 World Series that A-Rod was opting out of his Yankee contract. Even though the move did end up making millions more Yankee dollars for Rodriguez, it was a public relations disaster for him at the same time.

By the time 2008 rolled around, A-Rod was still saying no comment to the reporters but the papparazzi photos of his extra marital actions started speaking a lot louder than his words. With the Yankees struggling with injuries under then new manager, Joe Girardi, the sports pages of the New York tabloids were filled with photos of Rodriguez in night time action. Unfortunately, none of those photos showed A-Rod with a baseball uniform on.

Then during the spring of 2009 we learned that A-Rod did take steroids. So in the space of just two and a half pinstripe seasons, Rodriguez’s actions verified his greed, his marital infidelity and his cheating on the field, a sort of modern day ballplayer’s triple crown. But then came the Yankees’ glorious ’09 post season run, with Alex leading the way with some of the most impressive clutch hitting I’ve seen during my fifty years as an avid fan of MLB. He had reversed his reputation as a perennial goat of October, captured his elusive World Championship ring and gained the somewhat begrudging adoration of Big Apple fans all at the same time. It seemed too good to be true and perhaps it was. This past year we learned that Rodriguez visited, Dr Anthony Galea, the recently convicted Canadian “blood doctor” without telling the Yankee front-office.

So like many Yankee fans, I’m still wondering who this superstar is. The one good thing is that the newest version of A-Rod no longer attempts to profusely deny his faults. Instead, he just refuses to discuss them with the media, which is perfectly OK by me. The one I’ve watched play in pinstripes these past eight seasons is certainly one of the most talented baseball players I’ve seen in the last half-century and I guess I’m hoping that is how he will be remembered.

Ironically, this Yankee who stopped talking about himself shares his birthday with another Yankee who never could. This utility-infielder and this Yankee starting pitcher from the 1950′s were also born on July 27th.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
2004 NYY 155 698 601 112 172 24 2 36 106 28 80 131 .286 .375 .512 .888
2005 NYY 162 715 605 124 194 29 1 48 130 21 91 139 .321 .421 .610 1.031
2006 NYY 154 674 572 113 166 26 1 35 121 15 90 139 .290 .392 .523 .914
2007 NYY 158 708 583 143 183 31 0 54 156 24 95 120 .314 .422 .645 1.067
2008 NYY 138 594 510 104 154 33 0 35 103 18 65 117 .302 .392 .573 .965
2009 NYY 124 535 444 78 127 17 1 30 100 14 80 97 .286 .402 .532 .933
2010 NYY 137 595 522 74 141 29 2 30 125 4 59 98 .270 .341 .506 .847
2011 NYY 99 428 373 67 103 21 0 16 62 4 47 80 .276 .362 .461 .823
2012 NYY 122 529 463 74 126 17 1 18 57 13 51 116 .272 .353 .430 .783
19 Yrs 2524 11163 9662 1898 2901 512 30 647 1950 318 1217 2032 .300 .384 .560 .945
NYY (9 yrs) 1249 5476 4673 889 1366 227 8 302 960 141 658 1037 .292 .387 .538 .925
SEA (7 yrs) 790 3515 3126 627 966 194 13 189 595 133 310 616 .309 .374 .561 .934
TEX (3 yrs) 485 2172 1863 382 569 91 9 156 395 44 249 379 .305 .395 .615 1.011
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 7/27/2013.

July 26 – Happy Birthday “Sad Sam” Jones

The last Boston Red Sox team to win a World Series during the 20th century was the 1918 squad. Their starting rotation consisted of Carl Mays, Bullet Joe Bush, Babe Ruth and today’s Pinstripe Birthday celebrant, “Sad Sam” Jones. By 1922, three of the four were pitching for the Yankees and the fourth was on his way to becoming New York’s and all of baseball’s most famous home-run hitter of all time.

During Sad Sam’s four years as a starter in Beantown, he won 64 games including 23 in 1921. He then won 67 games during his five seasons in pinstripes, including a 21-victory season in 1923. He remained in the big leagues until 1935, retiring when he was 42-years-old, with a lifetime record of 229-217 with 36 career shutouts.

An interesting fact about Jones’ career was that opposing runners stole very few bases off of old Sam despite the fact that he almost never attempted a pick-off throw. What was his secret for scaring would-be base-stealers from even trying to run against him? According to a 1954 article in the Baseball Digest, Jones would just stare at runners until they would inevitably walk back to first. As soon as they started their trip back to the bag, Jones would throw the next pitch.

Sad Sam shares his July 26th birthday with this much more recent Yankee pitcherthis pinch-hitter on the 1970 Yankees team and this former Yankee left-fielder.

Year Tm W L W-L% ERA G GS GF CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR BB SO WHIP
1922 NYY 13 13 .500 3.67 45 28 15 20 0 8 260.0 270 132 106 16 76 81 1.331
1923 NYY 21 8 .724 3.63 39 27 8 18 3 4 243.0 239 114 98 11 69 68 1.267
1924 NYY 9 6 .600 3.63 36 21 7 8 3 3 178.2 187 85 72 6 76 53 1.472
1925 NYY 15 21 .417 4.63 43 31 8 14 1 2 246.2 267 147 127 14 104 92 1.504
1926 NYY 9 8 .529 4.98 39 23 11 6 1 5 161.0 186 104 89 6 80 69 1.652
22 Yrs 229 217 .513 3.84 647 487 116 250 36 31 3883.0 4084 2008 1656 151 1396 1223 1.411
BOS (6 yrs) 64 59 .520 3.39 157 124 30 83 18 4 1045.0 1069 474 394 16 338 307 1.346
NYY (5 yrs) 67 56 .545 4.06 202 130 49 66 8 22 1089.1 1149 582 492 53 405 363 1.427
WSH (4 yrs) 50 33 .602 3.70 104 100 3 49 7 1 709.2 745 352 292 24 235 217 1.381
CHW (4 yrs) 36 46 .439 4.20 105 98 6 39 3 0 700.1 777 400 327 46 251 222 1.468
CLE (2 yrs) 4 9 .308 3.62 49 9 26 2 0 4 149.0 133 79 60 0 65 42 1.329
SLB (1 yr) 8 14 .364 4.32 30 26 2 11 0 0 189.2 211 121 91 12 102 72 1.650
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 7/26/2013.

July 19 – Happy Birthday Bob Meusel

Imagine if today, there were brothers starting in left field for both the Yankees and Mets and both were All Stars. They’d be Madison Avenue darlings.

From 1921 to 1924, Elmer Frederick “Irish” Meusel was John McGraw’s left-fielder on four consecutive pennant winning and two world championship teams. His four season RBI total for the Giants beginning in 1922, was 470.

Irish was not, however, the best left fielder playing for the home team in the Polo Grounds, back then. He was not even considered the best left-fielder in his family. That honor went to his younger and much more ornery brother Bob, who played for the Yankees. The Big Apple has not had a set of better-playing brothers since the Meusels were in town.

Consider this. In 1922, Irish drove in 111 runs for the Giants and “Long Bob” led the AL in RBIs with 138. That’s a total of 249 RBI’s from one set of brothers. In 1941, The DiMaggio boys had 283 RBIs in one season but there were three of them. Even more impressively, in the five seasons from 1921 until 1925, the Meusel brothers combined to drive in 1,125 runs.

If the Meusel’s were around today, I could see Reebok or Nike releasing a new pair of baseball shoes. The left one would be called the “Irish” and the right one, “Long Bob.” Or perhaps modern sneaker companies would have been turned off by the  attitude and behavior of today’s Pinstripe Birthday celebrant.

As I dug deeper into the younger Meusel’s background, I found he had developed a reputation for being lazy on the field. Such criticism came not just from sportswriters of that era but from Meusel’s own Manager, the great Miller Huggins. It was also referenced in his New York Time’s obituary which stated that Meusel’s alleged laziness may have been in appearance only, caused by the fact that the tall, graceful athlete had such a long and loping stride, that he always looked like he was running slow even when he was not. I also found articles indicating that Meusel was not known as a very friendly guy. In 1924, he charged the pitcher in a game in Detroit with his bat-in-hand setting off one of the worst riots in MLB history. Other published accounts described the California native as “dark” and “moody” and a perennial complainer especially when it was time to sign a
contract or comply with a league rule.

But no one disputes Meusel’s five-tool talent on the field. This guy could run, hit, hit for power, field and had a shotgun for an arm. He played left field for one of the greatest Yankee teams in history and during his decade in New York the Yankees appeared in their first six World Series and earned the franchise’s first three championship banners. Meusel’s Yankee career ended when he was sold to the Reds after the 1929 season. During his ten seasons in pinstripes he hit 146 home runs, drove in 1,005 runs, hit .311 and maintained a .500 slugging percentage.

Long Bob shares his July 19th birthday with one of his old Murderer’s Row teammatesthis former Yankee southpaw , and this much more recent Yankee reliever.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1920 NYY 119 494 460 75 151 40 7 11 83 4 20 72 .328 .359 .517 .876
1921 NYY 149 647 598 104 190 40 16 24 135 17 34 88 .318 .356 .559 .915
1922 NYY 121 525 473 61 151 26 11 16 84 13 40 58 .319 .376 .522 .898
1923 NYY 132 503 460 59 144 29 10 9 91 13 31 52 .313 .359 .478 .837
1924 NYY 143 630 579 93 188 40 11 12 120 26 32 43 .325 .365 .494 .859
1925 NYY 156 697 624 101 181 34 12 33 138 13 54 55 .290 .348 .542 .889
1926 NYY 108 474 413 73 130 22 3 12 78 16 37 32 .315 .373 .470 .842
1927 NYY 135 582 516 75 174 47 9 8 103 24 45 58 .337 .393 .510 .902
1928 NYY 131 577 518 77 154 45 5 11 113 6 39 56 .297 .349 .467 .816
1929 NYY 100 414 391 46 102 15 3 10 57 2 17 42 .261 .292 .391 .683
11 Yrs 1407 6027 5475 826 1693 368 95 156 1064 143 375 619 .309 .356 .497 .852
NYY (10 yrs) 1294 5543 5032 764 1565 338 87 146 1002 134 349 556 .311 .358 .500 .858
CIN (1 yr) 113 484 443 62 128 30 8 10 62 9 26 63 .289 .330 .460 .790
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 7/18/2013.

July 18 – Happy Birthday Joe Torre

I was one of those Yankee fans who screamed the loudest when the recently departed George Steinbrenner pegged this guy to replace Buck Showalter as Yankee manager after the 1995 playoff loss to Seattle. We had good reason to be skeptics. Up until then, Torre had managed the Mets, Braves and Cardinals, losing an average of 90 games per year and compiling a dreadful .472 winning percentage. It seemed as if the Yankees had turned the corner with Showalter and when he got fired, one year after the miserable players strike, I was about ready to stop watching baseball.

Boy was I wrong. 1996 turned out to be one of the, if not the greatest years of my life as a Yankee fan and Joe Torre’s managerial skills were a huge part of the reason why. Not only was he adept at Steinbrenner diplomacy, he was also a great communicator with his players and it seemed every move he made from the dugout was the right one.

Joe’s tenure with the Yankees was a wonderful time in the team’s history (although my euphoria has been significantly dampened with the steroids usage disclosures involving several Yankees who played for Torre) and Yankee fans will always admire and be grateful for the calm, professional way he handled the immense pressure and responsibilities that came with the job.

Here’s a look at the regular season career Yankee won-loss records of the top five winning managers in pinstripe history:

Manager – World Championships Wins Losses Pct.
Joe McCarthy - 7 1460 867 .627
Joe Torre - 4 1173 767 .605
Casey Stengel - 7 1149 696 .623
Miller Huggins – 3 1067 719 .597
Ralph Houk - 2 944 806 .539

Joe shares a birthday with this Yankee pitcher, who started the first game ever in the newly renovated Yankee Stadium in April of 1976. This former Yankee pinch-hitter was also born on July 18th as was this much more recent NY utility infielder.

Here’s Torre’s season-by-season record as Yankee skipper and his lifetime totals by teams he managed during his career:

Rk Year Age Tm Lg G W L W-L% Finish
16 1996 55 New York Yankees AL 162 92 70 .568 1 WS Champs
17 1997 56 New York Yankees AL 162 96 66 .593 2
18 1998 57 New York Yankees AL 162 114 48 .704 1 WS Champs
19 1999 58 New York Yankees AL 162 98 64 .605 1 WS Champs
20 2000 59 New York Yankees AL 161 87 74 .540 1 WS Champs
21 2001 60 New York Yankees AL 161 95 65 .594 1 AL Pennant
22 2002 61 New York Yankees AL 161 103 58 .640 1
23 2003 62 New York Yankees AL 163 101 61 .623 1 AL Pennant
24 2004 63 New York Yankees AL 162 101 61 .623 1
25 2005 64 New York Yankees AL 162 95 67 .586 1
26 2006 65 New York Yankees AL 162 97 65 .599 1
27 2007 66 New York Yankees AL 162 94 68 .580 2
New York Mets 5 years 709 286 420 .405 5.3
Atlanta Braves 3 years 486 257 229 .529 2.0
St. Louis Cardinals 6 years 706 351 354 .498 3.5
New York Yankees 12 years 1942 1173 767 .605 1.2 6 Pennants and 4 World Series Titles
Los Angeles Dodgers 3 years 486 259 227 .533 2.0
29 years 4329 2326 1997 .538 2.6 6 Pennants and 4 World Series Titles
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 7/18/2013.

July 13 – Happy Birthday Jack Aker

Jack Aker was traded to New York from Seattle early in the 1969 regular season for fellow-reliever, Freddie Talbot. Yankee manager, Ralph Houk used his new right-hander as the team’s closer the last four months of that season and Aker responded well to that role by winning eight of twelve decisions and earning 11 saves. He then followed that performance up with his best season as a Yankee in 1970, when he recorded 16 saves, won 4 of 6 decisions and posted a sterling 2.06 ERA.  He was 16-10 during his three plus seasons in pinstripes with a total of 31 saves. He became expendable in 1972, after Sparky Lyle joined the team and when New York acquired Johnny Callison from the Cubs for a player to be named later in January of 1972, Aker became that player to be named later. His 32 saves for the lowly Athletics in 1966 led the American League. When he retired after the 1974 season, he had 123 lifetime saves.

Aker shares his July 13th birthday with this Yankee from the far east, this Hall of Fame pitcher and this former Yankee outfielder.

Year Tm W L W-L% ERA G GS GF CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR BB SO WHIP
1969 NYY 8 4 .667 2.06 38 0 23 0 0 11 65.2 51 17 15 4 22 40 1.112
1970 NYY 4 2 .667 2.06 41 0 28 0 0 16 70.0 57 19 16 3 20 36 1.100
1971 NYY 4 4 .500 2.59 41 0 20 0 0 4 55.2 48 20 16 3 26 24 1.329
1972 NYY 0 0 3.00 4 0 4 0 0 0 6.0 5 2 2 0 3 1 1.333
11 Yrs 47 45 .511 3.28 495 0 321 0 0 123 746.0 679 312 272 63 274 404 1.277
OAK (5 yrs) 19 20 .487 3.54 220 0 142 0 0 58 343.1 302 146 135 30 121 210 1.232
NYY (4 yrs) 16 10 .615 2.23 124 0 75 0 0 31 197.1 161 58 49 10 71 101 1.176
CHC (2 yrs) 10 11 .476 3.51 95 0 71 0 0 29 130.2 141 64 51 12 46 61 1.431
NYM (1 yr) 2 1 .667 3.48 24 0 16 0 0 2 41.1 33 18 16 4 14 18 1.137
ATL (1 yr) 0 1 .000 3.78 17 0 8 0 0 0 16.2 17 11 7 3 9 7 1.560
SEP (1 yr) 0 2 .000 7.56 15 0 9 0 0 3 16.2 25 15 14 4 13 7 2.280
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 7/12/2013.

July 5 – Happy Birthday Goose Gossage

I never agreed with the the Yankee’s decision to sign the Goose as a free agent during the 1977 post season. Sparky Lyle had just won the AL Cy Young Award the season before and the Yankees had won the World Series. They did not need a closer and adding another one to the team was the type of overkill that could only end up disrupting team chemistry in the long run. When I read about Gossage’s signing, I figured Lyle was a goner and I had always been a fan of the “Count.”

I was wrong about Lyle being a goner in 1978. The Yankees did figure out a pretty effective way to keep Lyle in the mix but Gossage emphatically took over the closer’s role and remained the ace of the Yankee pen for a half-dozen seasons, saving 150 games and winning 41 more in the process.

The Yankees finally traded Lyle in 1979, sending him to Texas in a multiplayer deal that put Dave Righetti in Pinstripes. Goose’s shower room brawl with Cliff Johnson helped ruin the Yankee’s 1979 season but in 1980, a big young right-hander named Ron Davis became the Yankee’s set-up man and he and Gossage teamed to deliver what I still consider to be some of the best relief pitching I have ever seen. Unfortunately, George Brett’s three-run shot of Goose in the third game of the AL playoffs that season was not a great moment in Yankee history.

Goose was indeed a monster on the mound and deserves being in Cooperstown but I still think his signing was a matter of greed and not need on the part of Yankee management. Goose was born on this date in 1951, in Colorado Springs, CO.

Goose shares his July 5th birthday with this 1965 winner of the AL Rookie of the Year Award, this former Yankee pitcher and pitching coach and this one-time Yankee starting pitcher from the late thirties. 

Year Tm W L W-L% ERA G GS GF CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR BB SO WHIP
1978 NYY 10 11 .476 2.01 63 0 55 0 0 27 134.1 87 41 30 9 59 122 1.087
1979 NYY 5 3 .625 2.62 36 0 33 0 0 18 58.1 48 18 17 5 19 41 1.149
1980 NYY 6 2 .750 2.27 64 0 58 0 0 33 99.0 74 29 25 5 37 103 1.121
1981 NYY 3 2 .600 0.77 32 0 30 0 0 20 46.2 22 6 4 2 14 48 0.771
1982 NYY 4 5 .444 2.23 56 0 43 0 0 30 93.0 63 23 23 5 28 102 0.978
1983 NYY 13 5 .722 2.27 57 0 47 0 0 22 87.1 82 27 22 5 25 90 1.225
1989 NYY 1 0 1.000 3.77 11 0 6 0 0 1 14.1 14 6 6 0 3 6 1.186
22 Yrs 124 107 .537 3.01 1002 37 681 16 0 310 1809.1 1497 670 605 119 732 1502 1.232
NYY (7 yrs) 42 28 .600 2.14 319 0 272 0 0 151 533.0 390 150 127 31 185 512 1.079
CHW (5 yrs) 29 36 .446 3.80 188 37 80 16 0 30 584.2 534 269 247 34 288 419 1.406
SDP (4 yrs) 25 20 .556 2.99 197 0 157 0 0 83 298.0 255 109 99 19 92 243 1.164
OAK (2 yrs) 4 7 .364 3.78 69 0 25 0 0 1 85.2 81 37 36 11 45 66 1.471
SFG (1 yr) 2 1 .667 2.68 31 0 22 0 0 4 43.2 32 16 13 2 27 24 1.351
PIT (1 yr) 11 9 .550 1.62 72 0 55 0 0 26 133.0 78 27 24 9 49 151 0.955
TEX (1 yr) 4 2 .667 3.57 44 0 16 0 0 1 40.1 33 16 16 4 16 28 1.215
CHC (1 yr) 4 4 .500 4.33 46 0 33 0 0 13 43.2 50 23 21 3 15 30 1.489
SEA (1 yr) 3 0 1.000 4.18 36 0 21 0 0 1 47.1 44 23 22 6 15 29 1.246
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 7/5/2013.

July 4 – Happy Birthday George Steinbrenner

Like him or not, George Steinbrenner recognized better than anyone that the Yankee brand and New York City were the hottest sports properties on the planet. In 1973, he purchased the team from CBS for a bargain basement price using other people’s money and immediately began making the franchise more valuable by the minute. He pretty much single-handedly restored the aura of the interlocking N-Y logo. George was born on today’s date in 1930 in Cleveland.

The Boss was managing owner of  the Yankees for a record 37 years. His Yankee teams won 11 AL Pennants and 7 World Series. He changed the team’s manager 20 times and hired 11 different GMs. His enthusiastic pursuit of free agents, beginning with Catfish Hunter changed the salary structure of professional baseball forever. He was suspended from the League twice. His entrepreneurial vision was the driving force behind the YES Entertainment Network and when he died in July of 2010, the team he had paid $10 million for was worth $1.2 billion.

George shares his birthday with this former Yankee pitcher he once described as being “scared stiff” on the mound. This former Yankee utility infielder was also born on Independence Day as was this long-time Yankee radio announcer.

July 3 – Happy Birthday Cesar Tovar, Juan Rivera & Brian Cashman

For Yankee fans not old enough to remember Cesar Tovar, think of a Chone Figgins with more defensive versatility. He spent his first eight big league seasons with Minnesota, where he played every position but catcher, led the league in hits in 1971, averaged .281 in 1,090 games and stole 186 bases. He then spent the final five years of his career playing for five different teams, ending up with the Yankees in 1976, where he played his final thirteen big league games.

Juan Rivera was a power hitting outfield prospect in the Yankee organization who played for the parent club in 2001, ’02 and ’03. New York was hoping he’d replace Paul O’Neil in right field.He got his longest shot during his last season in pinstripes, appearing in 57 games and smacking 7 home runs. But that wasn’t good enough for the Yankee brass, who bundled Rivera with Nick Johnson and Randy Choate in the trade with Montreal that brought Javier Vazquez to the Bronx the first time. Rivera’s now found a home in the Angels’ outfield.

Today is also Brian Cashman’s birthday. The Yankee GM started as an intern in the Yankee front office where he caught the eye of “the Boss” and the rest is history.